Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Live Italy, Sanremo 23-03-1963

Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Live Italy, Sanremo 23-03-1963

Drums: ART BLAKEY, Trumpet: FREDDIE HUBBARD, Sax: WAYNE SHORTER, Trombone: CURTIS FULLER, Piano: CEDAR WALTON, Contrabass: REGGIE WORKMAN.

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12 Responses to “Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Live Italy, Sanremo 23-03-1963”

  1. soulgriot says:

    Non-musical observation . . . their suits are back in style!

  2. Great to see/hear this. My favorite Jazz Messenger line up! Brilliant players, brilliant music,,, Italians getting a jolt of American music,,, still a jolt here today in the usa. Does anybody play like this today?

  3. Chills man, thanks for this.

  4. I fact I read somewhere in print many years ago from an interview with Freddie. He said he told Art after a tune that his chops were in need of little a rest… and Art promptly called the next tune to feature Freddie. Ow.
    Maybe that’s why Freddie used to have that sheer stamina soon after?
    He was known to go as many as a dozen or takes on studio recordings, amazing on many levels.
    Man, I miss him but he’ll live in my spirit forever.

  5. genesee gbh says:

    Stage Intro

    Children of the Night

    Skylark

    In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning

    That Old Feeling

    I Didn’t Know What Time It Was

    Mosaic

    Moanin’

  6. Jazz Gemz says:

    Look, I really don’t want to wax philosophical, but I will say that if you’re alive, you got to flap your arms and legs, you got to jump around a lot, you got to make a lot of noise, because life is the very opposite of death. And therefore, as I see it, if you’re quiet, you’re not living. You’ve got to be noisy, or at least your thoughts should be noisy and colorful and lively.

  7. yes but in Italy that wasn’t so clear… in Italy in the ’50′s many people liked “modern jazz” but they only knew the West Coast scene – things changed after concerts like these. Post Scriptum: in the italian language “negro” means black, not “nigger”. No racism at all, I mean ;o)

  8. in Italia a quell’epoca “negro” significava “nero” e basta – e bisognava chiarire che il jazz era una musica afro-americana. Mio padre conosceva solo il Dixieland e il West Coast Jazz. Concerti come questo aprirono gli occhi a tutta una generazione di aficionados!

  9. pjwsax says:

    Jump to 4:28 to skip the long intro and go straight to the music.

  10. Javier Soto says:

    That trumpet on skylark…wow.

  11. Laurie C. says:

    Man they are nice!!! Like this!

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